Ready for the beach? Let me send you on vacation in style with a fabulous SUMMER KINDLE GIVEAWAY! I’m giving away a brand new Kindle Fire and a beautiful peach patterned beach bag! SUMMER KINDLE...

Escape to Paradise Giveaway

The authors of Escape to Paradise are excited to share this awesome boxed set with you! It’s easy to enter, so don’t delay! There’s no catch – we just want to share the love and let people know about this book. You can earn extra entries by sharing with your friends, so once you’ve entered, make sure to click “Refer a Friend” and use your unique URL to share! Escape to Paradise Pre-Order...

JD Monroe Street Team

Hey everyone! I’m really excited to finally be building a street team. I’m looking for a few awesome readers and friends to help me spread the word about upcoming releases. If you’re willing to… *Check my fan page once in a while to like or comment on things that interest you *Share posts/links for releases, preorders, or giveaways *Write short reviews to share on Amazon or Goodreads Then check this out!  ...

Thriller Thursday – Sloss Furnaces

So I’ve had a (somewhat spotty) tradition of Thriller Thursday over at my Facebook page, but this week’s find turned into a much longer post so I thought I’d try posting it over here as a blog instead. Since I write about Southern monster hunters in my Hell’s Belles series, I often research Southern folklore and haunted locations. I’m also into costuming, so imagine my delight when the Sloss Furnaces in Birmingham, Alabama, turned up on a list of the South’s most haunted locations. Why is costuming even relevant, you ask? Well, one of my talented friends, Matt Nicholson, is the photography genius behind Dim Horizon Studios, and he often does amazing costumed photo shoots at Sloss. (And apparently, he’s braver than me, because the stories are enough to scare me silly!)   So let’s get into the scary stuff. Just a few years after the city’s founding, the Sloss Furnaces were built in the 1880s in Birmingham, taking advantage of the city’s proximity to plentiful deposits of the raw materials needed to produce steel: iron, limestone, and coal. Hundreds of locals were employed there, but employment as Sloss should have been described as “at your own risk.” If you believe everything you hear, a Dante-style “Abandon all hope, ye who enter hear,” might have been appropriate. Pretentious literary allusions aside, Sloss’s heyday was well before the advent of OSHA, and there were no government agencies to enforce safety regulations or indeed, provide any sort of protection for the plant’s employees from its many hazards. On any given day – which could be twelve hours at low pay – workers risked everything from a...

Sneak Peek of New Book

For my newsletter readers, I’m sharing a quick sneak peek of a new book. It’s tentatively titled Missing, but I’m sure that will change. For now, here’s the first snippet:   Forty-eight hours from now, he’d be fifty thousand dollars richer. Not bad for a weekend’s work. There were a few critical points, with potential for disaster along the way, but everything was smooth sailing once he delivered the package. The boss would be happy, the client would be happy, and that meant he was happy. His phone vibrated. He switched the plastic shopping basket to his left hand and took his phone from his pocket to see a notification. PerfectPair: You have a new message from a match! He swiped the message and skimmed it. A smile curved up his lips. I’ll meet u there if that’s ok Hook, line, and sinker. He quickly composed a reply. That’s cool. How about 8? We can get a good table and stay for show. The key was to let her feel like she was in control of the whole situation. There had been a long pause between his previous message and her reply. He could see her debating how to properly respond. She’d wanted to be cautious, but still seem approachable. He respected that. He also respected the fact that she was twenty-nine years old, had no surviving relatives, and was healthy as a horse as of her last physical four months earlier. There was something admirable about a woman who kept herself in good repair. Nothing in her medical records indicated any hidden issues. And she was the white...

Augusta Literary Festival

Come out to the Augusta Literary Festival for great panels and tons of author signings! It’s a great chance to meet local authors and chat about your favorite books. Make sure to mark Saturday, March 5 on your...

Perfectionism – The Deceptive Flaw

So as I was writing my newest newsletter, I found myself on a lengthy tangent about perfectionism. At the risk of my email turning into a bloated beast, I decided to turn it into a blog post. Which is probably not a bad choice, considering I’m TERRIBLE about blogging and haven’t posted since August! Anyway. I like to touch on my experiences and what I’m learning through the month about the work of writing, and that was how I found myself on the topic of perfectionism. For a long time, I considered perfectionism to be one of those “not-flaw” flaws. You know, when you’re at a job interview and they ask you, “So, what do you consider your greatest weakness?” “Oh, I’m a real perfectionist.” And when people say that, most of them mean it as a way to make themselves sound humble without really recognizing it as a flaw. It’s viewed as a good thing, a shorthand for “I have high standards and I’m very particular about meeting them.” It’s a way to say “I’ll stress myself out to do the best job I can,” which communicates that you work hard and do good work, which are not inherently problematic. The problem is that perfectionism can, and often does, go beyond that. There’s nothing wrong with having high standards. The problem is that the person plagued with perfectionism often cannot tell the difference between ridiculous and realistic standards. I’ve discovered this about myself in recent years. Due to some major life upsets and dealing with a stretch of time which can only be described as a true shit...

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